Caryacarya-3

(2) Matsyamudrá (fish posture): Lie down in padmásana. Rest the crown of the head on the floor and grasp both the big toes with the hands. Practise three times. Maximum time for practice is two-and-a-half minutes.

(3) Matsyásana (fish posture): Lie down in padmásana. Grasp each shoulder with the opposite hand from behind. The head will rest on both the forearms. Practise three times, each time for half a minute.

(4) Matsyendrásana (Matsyendra’s posture): generally for males:

(i) Press the múládhára cakra with the right heel. Cross the left foot over the right thigh and keep it to the right of the thigh. Grasp the left big toe with the right hand, keeping the right arm along the left side of the left knee. Reach backwards from the left side with the left hand and touch the navel.

Turn the neck to the left as far as possible.

(ii) Then press the múládhára with the left heel and reverse the process. One round means completing the process on both sides.

Practise four rounds, half a minute each time.

(5) Viirásana (viira posture): Kneel down and sit on the heels. Bend the toes downwards. Rest the backs of the hands on the thighs, the fingers pointing towards the groin. Direct the vision at the tip of the nose. The ácárya will give directions as to the duration of this ásana.

(6) Cakrásana (wheel posture): Lie in a supine position. Flex the legs to bring the lower legs in contact with the thighs. Both the hands will rest close to the shoulders. Supporting the weight on the soles and the palms, raise the head and the trunk. The body will assume the shape of a wheel in this ásana. Duration – half a minute. Practise four times.

(7) Naokásana (boat posture) or dhanurásana (bow posture): Lie in a prone position. Flex the legs to bring the lower legs close to the thighs. Directing the hands over the back, grasp the ankles. Raise the entire body, supporting the weight on the navel. Extend the neck and chest as far back as possible. Look towards the front. Breathe in while raising the body and maintain yourself in that state for eight seconds. Resume the original posture while breathing out. Practise the ásana eight times in this manner. The body assumes the shape of a bow during this ásana.

(8) Utkat́a pashcimottánásana (difficult back-upwards posture): Lie in a supine position and extend the arms backwards, keeping them close to the ears. Rise while exhaling and insert the face between the knees. Make sure that the legs remain straight. Grasp both the big toes with the hands. Remain in this state for eight seconds. Now resume the original posture while inhaling. Practise eight times in this way.

(9) Parvatásana (mountain posture) or halásana (plough posture): Assume the position of sarváuṋgásana. Gradually bring the legs backwards and extend them as far as possible. Let the toes of both feet touch the ground. Keep both the hands in a prone position on either side of the body. Duration – as in the case of sarváuṋgásana.

(10) Shivásana (Shiva posture): Assume the position of Parvatásana. Bend the knees until they come close to the ears. Do not place the hands as in parvatásana, but interlock the fingers firmly and keep the hands in contact with the ground. Duration – as for sarváuṋgásana.

(11) Vajrásana (thunder posture): Bend the right leg at the knee and direct the foot backwards, in such a way that it does not touch the right thigh. Supporting the weight on both the hands, direct the left foot backward in the same way. Now gradually sit on the floor. Raise the hands and place them on the knees. In the beginning practise this ásana very cautiously. Injury may result from trying to squat forcibly. Duration – half a minute. Practice four times.

(12) Siddhásana (siddha posture): Press the múládhára cakra with the left heel. Then press the svádhiśt́hána cakra with the right heel. Place the hands palm up on the respective knees. Duration – as long as you wish.

(13) Baddha padmásana (bound lotus posture): Assume the position of padmásana. Direct the right hand backwards from the right side and grasp the right big toe. In the same way, direct the left hand backwards and grasp the left big toe. Duration – half a minute. Practise four times.

(14) Kukkut́ásana (cock posture): Assume the position of padmásana and insert the hands and forearms in between the respective lower legs and thighs. Then raise the whole body, supporting the weight on the hands. Look forward. Duration – half a minute. Practise four times.

(15) Gomukhásana (cow’s head posture):

(i) Sit down and extend the legs forwards. Bring the right leg under the left thigh, placing the right foot under the left buttock. Now bring the left leg across the right thigh and place the left foot under the right buttock. Place the left hand on the spine. Then bring the right hand backward over the right shoulder and interlock the fingers of the hands in a chain-like fashion.

(ii) Practise in the same way with the left leg under the right leg. Completing this on both sides constitutes one round.

Duration of each position – half a minute. Practise four rounds.

(16) Mayúrásana (peacock posture): Assume a squatting position. Bring the wrists together and place the palms on the floor, with the fingers pointing towards the feet. Now bring the elbows in contact with the navel and stretch the legs backward. Supporting the weight on the elbows, raise the head and the legs from the floor. Duration – half a minute. Practise four times.

(17) Kúrmakásana (tortoise posture): Assume the position of padmásana. Insert both the forearms in between the lower legs and the thighs. Then grasp the neck with both the hands. Both the elbows will touch the floor, and the head will be bent forward. Look steadily in front as far as possible. Duration – half a minute. Practise four times.

(18) Sahaja utkat́ásana (simple chair posture): Seat yourself as if in a chair (but actually there will be no chair). Keep the arms straight to conform to the arms of the chair. Duration – half a minute. Practise four times.

(19) Shalabhásana (locust posture): Lie down on your chest. Stretch the hands backward with the palms upward. Raise the legs and the waist, keeping the fists clenched. Duration – half a minute. Practise four times.

(20) Bhújauṋgásana (snake posture): Lie down on your chest. Supporting the weight on the palms, raise the chest, directing your head backward. Look at the ceiling. Breathe in while rising, and after having risen, hold your breath for eight seconds. Come down to original position while breathing out. Practise eight times.

(21) Shasháuṋgásana (hare posture): Kneel down and grasp both the heels firmly. While exhaling, bring the crown of the head into contact with the floor in a posture of bowing down. The forehead should touch the knees. Maintain this posture for eight seconds, holding the breath. Breathe in while rising. Practise eight times.

(22) Bhastrikásana (bellows posture): Lie on your back, and while breathing out, bend the right leg and bring the thigh into contact with the chest. Grasp the leg firmly with both hands. Maintain this position for eight seconds, holding the breath. Resume original position while breathing in. Practise similarly with the left leg, and then with both legs together. One round comprises this process with the right leg, the left leg, and both legs together. Practise eight such rounds, i.e. 8 x 3 = 24 positions.

(23) Jánushirásana (head-to-knee posture): Press the múládhára with the right heel. Extend the left leg forward. While exhaling, touch the left knee with the forehead. Then, interlocking all the fingers firmly, press the left sole with the hands. There should be complete expiration when the forehead touches the knee. Maintain this position for eight seconds. Separate the hands and sit erect, while breathing in. Then press the múládhára with the left heel and repeat the above process exactly. One round comprises practising once with the left and once with the right leg. Practise four rounds.